Zeramex Company Blog

Side Effects of Dental Metal Implants: Impact on Human Health (Metal as a Risk Factor of Implantologic Treatment)

Dental implants are often made of titanium alloys. Implant therapy currently promises a good long-term result without impacting health; however, its success depends on many factors. In this article, the authors focus on the most common risk factors associated with metallic surgical implants.

Evaluation of the biological effect of Ti generated debris from metal implants: ions and nanoparticles

Metallic implants placed in humans exhibit wear and corrosion that result in the liberation of metal-containing by-products. In the case of titanium (Ti) containing implants, the metal containing debris may exist in a number of states, including metallic particles produced by mechanical wear and the products of metal corrosion in biological environments, such as the joints and surrounding fluids and tissues.

Titanium release in serum of patients with different bone fixation implants and its interaction with serum biomolecules at physiological levels

Titanium implants are routinely used for bone fractures as well as dental work. It has recently been shown that titanium-based implants both corrode and degrade, generating metallic debris. There is some concern over the increased concentrations of circulating metal-degradation products derived from these implants, and their potential harmful biological effects over a period of time, including hepatic injury and renal lesions.

Titanium Exposure and Human Health

This review is based on current titanium research demonstrating the many factors that can pose a negative impact on human health when exposed to the various forms of titanium, including its relationship and interactions with other metals.

Biological reaction to alumina, zirconia, titanium and polyethylene particles implanted onto murine calvaria

Biological reaction to alumina, zirconia, titanium and polyethylene particles implanted onto murine calvaria

The inflammatory response and bone resorption induced by ceramic particles were much smaller than those induced by polyethylene and Ti6Al4V. These biological features suggest the biocompatibility of ceramics as a joint surface material for artificial joints.

Intracellular uptake and toxicity of three different Titanium particles

Intracellular uptake and toxicity of three different Titanium particles

Nickel in the alloy NiTi induced an increase in the toxic potential compared to Titanium microparticles.

Titanium is a highly thrombogenic biomaterial: possible implications for osteogenesis

This study indicates that titanium is unsuitable as a biomaterial in devices which are in direct contact with blood for a prolonged period.

The Biological Effect of Particulate Titanium Contaminants of Dental Implants on Human Osteoblasts and Gingival Fibroblasts

The Biological Effect of Particulate Titanium Contaminants of Dental Implants on Human Osteoblasts and Gingival Fibroblasts

Cell viability is negatively correlated with titanium concentration. Further, titanium debris might lead to an inflammatory biologic response of dental peri-implant tissue.

Titanium as a modifier of the peri-implant microbiome structure

Titanium as a modifier of the peri-implant microbiome structure

Recent data support the implication of accelerated titanium dissolution products in peri-implantitis. It is unknown whether these dissolution products have an effect on the peri-implant microbiome, the target of existing peri-implantitis therapies.

Implant Tribune

Spotlight on ZERAMEX®XT for the month of April 2020